Three Day Tour of the South East of Ireland 

Tour Highlights

(Day 1) Dublin - Powerscourt House & Gardens - Glendalough - Avoca - Dunbrody Famine Ship - Waterford

Google route map Dublin to Waterford via Glendalough

Powerscourt Gardens in County Wicklow, one of the most beautiful gardens in Ireland! Powerscourt Gardens were recently voted No.3 in the World’s Top Ten Gardens by National Geographic. The Gardens stretch over 47 acres and offer visitors a sublime blend of formal gardens, sweeping terraces, statues and ornamental lakes, secret hollows and rambling walks. Managed by Head Gardener, Alex Slazenger and a team of four gardeners, Powerscourt Gardens were designed from 1731 onwards, with the desire to create a garden which was part of the wider surrounding landscape. 

Glendalough is home to one of the most important monastic sites in Ireland. This early Christian monastic settlement was founded by St. Kevin in the 6th century and from this developed the “Monastic City”. Most of the buildings that survive today date from the 10th through 12th centuries. Despite attacks by Vikings over the years, Glendalough thrived as one of Ireland’s great ecclesiastical foundations and schools of learning until the Normans destroyed the monastery in 1214 A.D. and the dioceses of Glendalough and Dublin were united. 

Dunbrody Famine Ship is one of the premier tourist attractions in the South East.  Centred on an authentic reproduction of an 1840’s emigrant vessel, it provides a world-class interpretation of the famine emigrant experience.
Incorporating guided tour, costumed performers and themed exhibitions of the highest quality, ‘The Dunbrody’ provides a unique insight into the bravery and fortitude with which Irish people faced up to a desperate situation.

Waterford, a seaport in the southeast, and is the country’s oldest city. It was founded by Vikings in 914 A.D. and parts of its ancient walled core remain. Within Reginald’s Tower, a circa-1003 fortification, the Waterford Museum of Treasures displays local archaeological finds. Famed glass manufacturer Waterford Crystal began here in 1783. Today the company’s facility near the historic district offers factory tours

 

(Day 2) Waterford - Lismore - Midleton Distillery - Cobh - Blarney castle

Google route map Waterford to Blarney via Cobh 

Lismore Castle is the Irish home of the Duke of Devonshire. Located in the town of Lismore in County Waterford in Ireland, it belonged to the Earls of Desmond, and subsequently to the Cavendish family from 1753.

Cobh is on an island in Cork city’s harbour. It’s known as the Titanic’s last port of call in 1912. Titanic Experience Cobh is a themed attraction in the former White Star Line ticket office. More displays on the liner are in the Cobh Heritage Centre, which also explores how Cobh became an embarkation point during Ireland’s mass emigrations. 

Midleton Distillery, the home of whiskey excellence, preserving the Pot Still tradition in Ireland for almost 200 years. The present Midleton Distillery is an intriguing study in whiskey production, given its unique ability to distill a wide variety of distillate types, it is one of the most remarkable distilleries in the world.

Blarney Castle, is a medieval stronghold. the current keep was built by the MacCarthy of Muskerry dynasty, a cadet branch of the Kings of Desmond, and dates from 1446. Tourists visiting Blarney Castle may hang upside-down over a sheer drop to kiss the stone, which is said to give the gift of eloquence.

(Day 3) Cork - Cahir Castle - Rock of Cashel - Kilkenny - Dublin

google route map Cork to Dublin route map via Kilkenny

Cork, is a university city with its centre on an island in the River Lee, connected to the sea by Cork Harbour. The castlelike 1824 Cork City Gaol once held prisoners bound for Australia, and exhibitions relay the building’s history. The hilltop steeple of 18th-century Shandon Church (officially the Church of Saint Anne) is a symbol of the city.

English Market, Situated in the heart of Cork City, the English Market is a roofed food market and has been trading since 1788.

Developed and still owned by Cork City Council, the Market is one of the oldest municipal markets of it’s kind in the world.

Cahir Castle.Once the stronghold of the powerful Butler family, the castle retains its impressive keep, tower and much of its original defensive structure. It is one of Ireland’s largest and best-preserved castles. It is situated on a rocky island on the River Suir.

Rock of Cashel.A spectacular group of Medieval buildings set on an outcrop of limestone in the Golden Vale including the 12th century round tower, High Cross and Romanesque Chapel, 13th-century Gothic cathedral, 15th century Castle and the restored Hall of the Vicars Choral.  Attractions include an audio-visual show and exhibitions.

Kilkenny is a medieval town in  Ireland. Its grand Kilkenny Castle was built in 1195 by Norman occupiers. The town has deep religious roots and many well-preserved churches and monasteries, including imposing St. Canice’s Cathedral and the Black Abbey Dominican priory, both from the 13th century. It’s also a crafts hub, with shops along its winding lanes selling pottery, paintings, and jewellery.

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